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to the to union, the former ambassador and the former secretary of pakistan to be hosted by the atlantic council here in washington, this is about 90 minutes. >> we are delighted to have you all. we are delighted to have our distinguished guests. it's pretty rare i think that you get three extraordinary ambassadors sitting next to one another each of whom has tremendous familiarity with the subject. on the council itself has been working on these issues for quite a number of years. this is actually the fourth anniversary of the salvation center. some of you may remember a few years ago the council did a very substantial report with respect to afghanistan. the then head of the council and the national security adviser was involved with some of the people in the audience involved frigate and we followed up on some of that work continuously over the last several years could get this is the latest installment if you will. i think that we all know that we are at an inflection point with respect to afghanistan to read a lot of the important decisions coming. president karzai is here to meet with presi
india and pakistan have a fear that what will have been, still inside pakistan, where they will go because pakistan is also among other nations. but reality can you give to those working in afghanistan? >> i think what we have to look at then is we have to rest comfortable with that list then, chicago, tokyo come in the international community has a huge commitment and frankly when we look at $16 billion of international commitment, it can, i don't think afghanistan is going to be standing alone. we'd like them to stand up, but again we need to be there. the >> can you review the bidding on what his profile at the insurgency today, roughly how many taliban either? how many al qaeda -- what are your best estimates and the breakdown between the hard-core click >> that it's a very difficult question. part of it deals with the nature of how things in the inning out of afghanistan for certain. i've seen numbers quite honestly as low as 20,000 insurgents and with the afghan partners around 30. the exact percentage of what's hard-core and what's not is very hard to break apart. i think th
governments recommit to dialogue as the right way forward on this. that's what we support. >> the pakistan form minister still in new york, if anyone had a talk with her? >> i think i mentioned yesterday that her senior meeting with u.s. government officials was with ambassador rice at the u.n. yesterday so i'll refer you to u.s.-u.n. for a readout on that. >> and pakistan? the situation in pakistan, the news media is talking about a situation during the general's takeover and many people say in pakistan it may be linked to 1971. what do you think -- what is the future of the political system in pakistan and now for the last five years or more, they have been going on. >> we had quite a bit to say about this situation yesterday, fundamentally this is an issue for pakistanis to resolve. they've got to resolve their internal political issues in a just and transparent way just to say again pakistan has an established electoral process as outlined in the constitution. that needs to be respected. we support civilian democracy in pakistan. >> just one quick one -- >> you really got a lot today.
, climbing support for the state department. you have pakistan and afghanistan, with the drawal from afghanistan that will only make it harder, and that has impact on pakistan. china, and russia. leadership in russia, as you know, very, very complicated. where does he look first for support, and, you know, who wants this job? >> i would say the middle east -- the hard thing that you hit on is the challenges for a secretary of state and for the united states generally in foreign policy have not waned. they have probably increased. in libya and benghazi and secretary clinton tried to make this point and senator kerry as well that the funding for all of these things is -- it's a fine it amount of money, and it's shrinking at the moment. the difficulty of a world that remains kredably complex, probably more complex, with our somewhat increasingly limited ability to sort of address every hotspot that we like, it's a very, very difficult challenge for any secretary of state. john kerry or anyone else. we saw it with hillary clinton. yes, she had successes clearly, but she also centeringled
's not over in afghanistan. b, to the degree that al qaeda has moved over into pakistan, that's a country that has over 100 nuclear weapons. syria, which is an ongoing problem. the suggestion constantly seems to be that we need to come in on the side of the rebels. there are at least 1,000 al qaeda members in syria today fighting on the side of the rebels. if the chemical weapons fall into their hands, big problems. you mentioned iran. remember now, and it may even have been on this program, i think that netanyahu suggested that come spring, come early summer, if the iranians still have not pulled back from building a nuclear weapon, the israelis may attack. the iranians would respond against the united states. and they have the capacity to do it with cyber war. >> i think it's even bigger and more troubling than that. it isn't just the middle east and that region. look at north korea. announcing that they are going to target the united states. they have nuclear weapons, unlike iran at this point. you look at what happened in algeria and mali. the egypt problem is not solved. i actually h
policy board and has served as a senior adviser as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrooke, former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy challenges of the day, you have to think about our next debater. his flagship global affairs overam on cnn is seen in 200 countries worldwide but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he rights a highly respected column for "the washington post" and is the editor-at-large of "time" magazine. his numerous best selling books include "the post-american world" and "the future of freedom." please welcome back to the munk debate stage, broadcaster and journalist, fareed zukaria. we are just moments from getting our debate underway but before we hear from opening statements, once again, i'm going to need this audience's assistance as the night goes on to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remarks and that we move forward as a debate together so you will see this countdown clock
three questions. one is afghanistan, the sec is pakistan. with regard to afghanistan, i wanted to ask you about the first question relates to president karzai and the leches ahead of them. when he was here just a couple of weeks ago, i had the chance to visit with him in leader mcconnel's office and a number of senators as well. and to ask him directly about the elections and ask him about my second question. but i wanted to get your sense of where you see those lexes going. what efforts you can undertake to make sure that they are free and fair because they've been, i think, central to the next chapter in this transition. i just wanted to comment on that. the second question as it relates to afghanistan is one that senator boxer raised and her work on this has been exemplary, on women and girls and in particular, i have a -- an amendment that we got through the national defense authorization act which would require both state and defense to file a report on the efforts to promote the security of afghan women and girls just by way of itemization monitoring and responding to changes in
at the instability in pakistan. this is a real danger we have to think about in the future. if we ignore them, that is a prescription for getting more americans killed. host: i want to get your reaction to what the secretary of state had to say yes today. here's what she had to say. [video clip] guest: i think you would hear the same from the intelligence community or dod. the work that was done in afghanistan and pakistan, they have taken out a whole cadre of leadership. people have migrated back to other parts of the world who are affiliates, part of the jihad syndicate. they are extremists and have designs on overthrowing existing governments, control and territory. there has been the decimation of al qaeda in the afghanistan- pakistan region, we have to contend with the wannabes and the affiliate's going forward. host: any reaction? guest: there has been a loss of capacity on the part of al qaeda central and pakistan. because osama bin laden is dead, that doesn't mean allocate it is dead -- it does mean al qaeda is dead. they are very much alive. they have migrated. they are now seeing a
time we are focusing on the leadership in afghanistan and pakistan,be taking the top-down approach, they are growing from the bottom up. they are expanding, they have armies and equip in the mal that i shall has migrated from libya. this is what happens i think when the united states doesn't take its involvement in the wars seriously. >> bret: bigger role or not? >> bigger role. >> bret: bigger role or not? >> yes, here. >> only logistical. >> bret: that is it for the panel. stay tuned to see how doing things what feels like the right thing may not be the best thing to do. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needingo go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alco
and pakistan. killed a lot of them. including bin laden. this is a global movement. senior u.s. intelligence officials acknowledge the arab spring, long-i'm ally sideline or degraded regional intelligence services and the weapons fuel capability of the islamist group. >> bret: iran and syria are threatening action against israel for airstrike inside syria wednesday. syria says israel hit a research facility. conor powell is sorting through things in jerusalem. >> syria's bloody civil war could be on the brink of expanding beyond the borders. as assad regime vowed to retaliation on airstrike on weapons convoy inside syria. u.s. officials confirm the strike on the convoy which was believed to be carrying sophisticated russian made fa-17. surface-to-air missiles from syria to t hezbollah fighters in lebanon. world leaders have long feared that the chaos of the syrian civil war would lead to transfer of weapons to extremist groups. syria denied weapons and claimed that israeli jets attacked a military facility outside damascus. syria's ally iran said there would be repercussions for israel. russ
because of the sort of backlash against the united states and u.s. installations and country like pakistan and egypt which are large recipient of the united. there's a powerful sentiment that the people don't us. they take the money and burn the flag. let cut them off. there's resolutions and stuff introduces. talk about how you respond or how you think the country ought to respond to the powerful sentiment. >> well, i think the common threat here is the presence of al qaeda and the affiliate. and the threat it poses to the world. from the standpoint of stability. and peaceful transition of governments. we're reminded of that almost every day. and -- sweeps across the middle of the world starting in indonesia and coming across northern africa and moving down to the sub sahara part of africa. this is a threat that has enormous implications. we have seen that ignoring the threat as we did in afghanistan pre 9/11. t true that the american public is more wary but never the less, we're reminding every day on cnn n and other networks and journalists from "the washington post . >> talk more i wan
afghanistan, pakistan? guest: the group in northern mali, it is making the news these days, is very closely tied. al qaeda and islamic maghrib were the first real franchise of al qaeda outside the middle east and south asia. this group had been formed in the 1990's to fight to overthrow the government of algeria. it metastasized over time. of syrians in north africa were the largest group present foreign fighters into iraq during the first stage of the u.s. presence over there. that led to five years ago when it formally allied itself with al qaeda, the first franchise. there's no direct command and control from al qaeda central, but they draw from the same equality and inspiration and one could argue and that they have been the most effective in recent days. host: here's a headline from the wall street journal -- why should americans care what is happening in mali? guest: this has become the most attractive place for jihadist around the world to gather especially since the french intervention occurred three weeks ago. foreign fighters coming into the region not only from across africa, but
's hoping he will have an effect across the border with the insurgency that he says stems from pakistan. >> general, have we met our goals there? >> do we know what our established goals are other than going after osama bin laden? >> the mission evolved over time, but first, under secretary rumsfeld we weren't going stay and then we got in a fight in 2002 and then we continued to drag this mission forward because we realized the taliban will be reconstituted. by 2005 they had reconstituted and they were posing an increasing threat. so i think this is one of the cases where the country belongs to afghanistan and afghans. it's not going to be the 51st state. we've trained the forces and we've done as much as we could. can we continue to have some training and support? yes. we've got osama bin laden and it's time to transition this mission and move on. >> atia, you were one of the last reporters to interview hamid karzai. he blamed nato-aligned forces for the insurgency that has rocked the nation recently. that finger-pointing itself did that come up within the meetings in washington becau
shows this morning but ours. it's a shame. i wanted to ask her about pakistan. i'll have to wait. >> what did you learn today? >> tomorrow matthew from downton abbey is coming. >> no way! >> disastrous booking. lady mary should be coming. >> talk to matthew about lady mary. >> it's like musburger has this creepy thing. >> very creepy. >> about a.j.'s girlfriend. you've got a creepy thing about lady mary. >> we all have a creepy thing about lady mary. >> what did you learn today? >> i learned elizabeth warren and i agree on this aig thing. >> that's what i learned! we have that in common. >> fantastic. >> what would elizabeth do? you're going to get a little sticker. >> we were just talking about being old and what constitutes being old. meacham brought up winston churchill. 65 when he became prime minister. saved western civilization. if you turned 60 now, my life's behind me. churchill, not prime minister until -- >> it's time for "morning joe." now it's time for the great chuck todd. >> he's fantastic. >> we love you, chuck. i'm sorry for him. >>> with afghanistan's president h
countries, including iran and pakistan. so right now it would be interesting to see what exactly is being discussed. at the most as we both now, america wants to leave afghanistan for the most part but the afghans feel america needs to stay. >> after president karzai met with different members of the senate yesterday, he was asked a very interesting question. but the lack of answer is the most telling. take a look. >> what kind of force would you like to see left in your country? >> thank you, everybody. >> i was told by the organizer of the senate to keep quiet after this one. >> thank you, everybody. >> told by the organizer to keep quiet on that and get a pat on the arm there by mitch mcconnell. proposed keeping 15,000 troops in afghanistan. the president hasn't made it clear exactly where the numbers are going to be. do you expect there could be a full withdrawal and won't be any type of -- left behind as atia is reporting. >> i don't think so. i think the zero option is a diplomatic bluff if you like, setting up the negotiations that are taking place right now as we speak, i think th
qaeda was central al qaeda in pakistan. afghanistan was still operating, largely with impunity. and our alliances in the world were shredded. there was tremendous antipathy toward the administration and the country, and that has all changed. everyone at this table would agree that the world is a very complicated and dangerous place because of a lot of different forces, a guy setting himself on fire in tunisia and a whole region goes up, and because of social media. so we are living in a different world, and what we need to do is to be smart about where we engage and when we engage, because we cannot project force everywhere in the world and we don't have the resources and it is not a smart way to proceed. >> the drone policy has spread all over the world. and that is sort of what we're known by best. and to the arab spring, the united states was not a passive observer in this. yes, a fruit vendor in tunisia set himself on fire. yes, there was social media that helped spread this enthusiasm for change. but the united states did turn its back on mubarak in egypt. and i think we're going t
an islamic overrun? what does it say about the reach of al qaeda now, not in pakistan or afghanistan, but in this new region, in north africa, and what, if any, policy does the obama administration have to combat? >> i think the algerian -- what we will remember about this week is not the gun measures and gun control proposals and maybe not president obama's second inaugural address for this reason. first of all, al qaeda is not done, unfortunately it has found new territory and the french are going in, to their credit to try and save mali and we are being slow, according to news reports, even providing backup help for them. the fact that -- i want to give them credit, the armed services committee of the house and the senate, would it ever happen in the past that the algerians would have felt they didn't have to let us know they were going in on a hostage rescue mission when americans were held hostage? not just not let us know, why didn't they ask for our help? we have a lot of assets in intelligence, and, we have a lot of well trained people who could become algerians for a day if
enthusiastically embraced drones. more than 300 in pakistan last year since obama took office. so it's something that obama's come to rely on very much but we still haven't clarified the legalities. >> and international opposed to domestic. harold ford jr. on "morning joe" today and former congressman, obviously, and he pointed out he get it is controversy and the moral issue but when it comes to putting boots on the ground, see it is logic in using drones in that respect. and i think a lot of people might agree with him to save a life of a soldier using a drone and then talking about domestically, people change. no one wants a drone over the home growing pot or not and some of the usage of the law enforcement personnel. >> sure. by the way, we right now are the only drone superpower. that's not to stay the same. drones are not hard to fly. other countries will be using them. we have to think about the precedent we are setting on the international scene for the use of drones. we fly them in to other people's countries and kill people there. if somebody did that to us, we'd be upset. >> everyone
discusses bill and her commitment to pakistan, senator feinstein described herself as a mayor on a mission. senator feinstein, you had an array of current mayors on a mission spinning with you, ready to do whatever is necessary to make sure this bill becomes a law. let's move forward. thank you. [applause] good afternoon, everyone. thank you very much, senator feinstein. thank you to the colleagues in the senate and the members that are here today in support of this legislation. i'm speaking today on behalf of the major city chiefs cities chiefs association. we are an organization made up of the 63 largest cities in the united states and i have the honor of serving as president of the organization on my way down here, i was on the train i received a call from the executive director of the international association of chiefs of police, which is the largest of all the police organization. unfortunately they could not be here today, but they wanted me to pass on to you their support in this legislation. members and executives, my good friends and chair of the national prevention for gun viole
envoy to afghanistan, sudan and pakistan at crucial moments. senator kerry advocated for democratic elections in the philippines. he was part of the delegation that uncovered the fraud that ultimately led to the removal of president ferdinand marcos. he was a strong proponent of u.s. action to end ethnic cleansing in kosovo and to impose sanctions on burma tied to human rights abuses. senator kerry has been a leader in promoting economic development and recovery in haiti, fighting global hiv-aids, supporting democracy and human dignity, and the advancement of human empowerment throughout the world. in his early days in the senate, senator kerry and i -- in fact, we were elected together in 1984, we came to the senate together, but right after that, shortly after that, senator kerry and i went on a fact-finding mission to nicaragua and unearthed information regarding the activities of the contra guerrillas which he presented to the committee on foreign relations. based in part on his ground-breaking findings, the committee launched an investigation into the funding of the contra guer
and pakistan, or al qaeda in the arabian peninsula. but this is something -- this is a multi-headed beast, if you will, and we are vigorous in our efforts to combat organizations like this and work with our allies to do so around the region and the world. >> on the question of gun legislation, it was made clear to us in the briefing yesterday that the white house will not send a comprehensive bill that contains all of gun control measures to capitol hill. it will defer to, in the case of the assault weapons ban and magazine size, senator feinstein, senator schumer on one aspect of it; senator gillibrand to another. and there are some house democrats who would prefer just the opposite approach -- a comprehensive bill, one vote, one package to concentrate the mind of the american public and to achieve a better legislative result. can you explain to us the strategic insight the white house has as to why it's better that the white house not to write it and send it up in one comprehensive bill? >> well, i'd answer it two ways. one, some of the legislation that we are talking about here, specif
in presence. i have always said afghanistan is not just about afghanistan. it is also about pakistan. the picture being painted here is a significantly less presence of u.s. involvement in that region with all the consequences that can come from that. >> we are going to try to bring it around here. i should have said when you do enter your question, ask for the microphone and stand and identify yourself and keep your question short. if we have time we will get back to you. >> please identify yourself. >> one of the things -- jack james from the american institute of german studies. i want to ask about europe and whether or not you think there's enough support coming from europe to deal with those issues. we just talked about it. germany as you well know, and britain, have been going in and out in afghanistan. there has been criticism about holding back. you mentioned constraints. is it not the case that we have to not only expect that if we can get it, europe will be helpful and we would like to not necessarily have a large premium and can you expect that? you know europe as well as
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)